Summer reading: Looking outwards, and looking back

Today’s recommendation comes from Jane Kremer, who will be shifting degree programmes to join Creative and Professional Writing in September, after stepping up and taking part in our student readings this year.

My recommendation is funnily enough a book that I got from our lecturer Jonathan after a reading. It’s called Guapa by Saleem Haddad and impressed me so much that I even consider it my new favourite book. Here’s why you should pick it up this summer: Throughout, the book has been written with a highly capturing writing style and plot. It deals with a young gay man – Rasa – who lives in the Middle East and stands in front of the shattered remains of his only big love in life. The plot reflects both on the relationship and why it failed, as well as on the main character’s childhood and upbringing.

I found it especially fascinating because the book gave me an insight into a completely unknown world – and I’m sure it will have a similar effect on anyone who has grown up up in Europe or other westernised countries.

The book reflects on the culture-clash of growing up with a Middle-Eastern father and a Western mother; on gay life in the Middle-East; on the political happenings during the Arab Spring. Then, when Rasa goes to study in the US while 9/11, he experiences a rapid shift of identity. After having felt different because of his homosexuality, his consciousness now shifts towards being a Muslim and he experiences what it’s like to wear this label in America.

The book is one of the rare works that manage to keep their quality up until the very last page – the ending is great, neither shallow nor otherwise disappointing.

A good book for people who like to broaden their horizons a little and who like to experience the feeling that they’re growing through the main character’s experiences! =)

This summer I will try to re-read El Principito (The Little Prince) by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, and as you can see from the title, I will try and read it in Spanish. I remember that I really liked the book when I read it as a child, so it will be interesting to see what I think of it now, perceiving it through adult eyes.

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