Summer reading: Looking outwards, and looking back

Today’s recommendation comes from Jane Kremer, who will be shifting degree programmes to join Creative and Professional Writing in September, after stepping up and taking part in our student readings this year.

My recommendation is funnily enough a book that I got from our lecturer Jonathan after a reading. It’s called Guapa by Saleem Haddad and impressed me so much that I even consider it my new favourite book. Here’s why you should pick it up this summer: Throughout, the book has been written with a highly capturing writing style and plot. It deals with a young gay man – Rasa – who lives in the Middle East and stands in front of the shattered remains of his only big love in life. The plot reflects both on the relationship and why it failed, as well as on the main character’s childhood and upbringing.

I found it especially fascinating because the book gave me an insight into a completely unknown world – and I’m sure it will have a similar effect on anyone who has grown up up in Europe or other westernised countries.

The book reflects on the culture-clash of growing up with a Middle-Eastern father and a Western mother; on gay life in the Middle-East; on the political happenings during the Arab Spring. Then, when Rasa goes to study in the US while 9/11, he experiences a rapid shift of identity. After having felt different because of his homosexuality, his consciousness now shifts towards being a Muslim and he experiences what it’s like to wear this label in America.

The book is one of the rare works that manage to keep their quality up until the very last page – the ending is great, neither shallow nor otherwise disappointing.

A good book for people who like to broaden their horizons a little and who like to experience the feeling that they’re growing through the main character’s experiences! =)

This summer I will try to re-read El Principito (The Little Prince) by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, and as you can see from the title, I will try and read it in Spanish. I remember that I really liked the book when I read it as a child, so it will be interesting to see what I think of it now, perceiving it through adult eyes.

Summer Reading: Hockey, jocks, pies and interruptions

Today’s Summer Reading recommendation comes from current 2nd Year Creative Writing student Amie Carden. Take it away, Amie…

My summer recommendation isn’t actually a book. I’ve been getting into webcomics recently, this one I binge read for hours after it was recommended to me by a friend of mine. With a cute art style, Check, Please! is about Eric Bittle, who is starting university in Massachusetts on a sport scholarship. Eric is a 5’6, blonde, amateur pâtissier who vlogs about his life and newly invented recipes. The loveable tiny member of the team really makes an impact on their team plays and on their living habits.

“It’s a story about hockey and friendship and bros and trying to find yourself during the best 4 years of your life.”

An adorable comedy around the friendships within a prestigious hockey team.


On a completely different note, I’ve been aiming to read this book for years. Since watching the film adaptation years ago, Girl, Interrupted has made me very intrigued as to what was missed out from the original diary, by author Susanna Kaysen. How many psychotic episodes didn’t make it to the final cut? What happened to them all after their stay in the ward? So this summer, I’ll be reading a memoir that shows just how insane it was to be sectioned in the 1960s.

Summer reading: international, anarchic and avant garde

Today’s Summer Reading recommendation comes from Juan Gutierrez, a current first year Creative and Professional Writing student:

Collected Poems by Raúl Gómez Jattin

Some might say Collected Poems contains the ramblings of a schizophrenic, a pervert, and a bum. Others might say it contains the beginning of all modern Latin American poetry aesthetic. It is all a part of the myth that has become Raúl Gómez Jattin’s life and work. His legacy is as spread out as it is controversial and he is both adored and despised by many. His work has not been forgotten, and his voice influenced an entire generation of poets in the rebellion to the rigid tradition of old Latin American literature. Collected Poems is an anthology that gives the English-speaking world a glimpse into the bizarre uniqueness of experimental Latin American poetry and the author’s brilliantly troubled mind. Raul Gomez Jattin paved the way for an academic acceptance and understanding of homosexual poetry and an anarchic structure. His poems capture the power of the Caribbean joie de vivre and his own existentialist conflicts, along with his sexual desires and his views on the people of Cartagena that surrounded him during his life. Aside from offering an interesting insight into a celebrated troubled man, Collected Poems is highly recommended also for the influence it has had on the Colombian literary landscape and the future of Latin American poetry.

Summer reading: for the footloose and fearless

Our next summer reading recommendation is from current second year Creative and Professional Writing student Philip Nash.

I’m going to recommend a travel narrative called The Places In Between by Rory Stewart. Stewart went on a solo hitchhike through Afghanistan, from Herat to Kabul, during a time of major terrorist threats when he could easily have been shot and killed. I was recommended it by a crazy American guy in my hostel in Utrecht who planned on hiking/hitchhiking from France to Greece.

Summer reading: Breaking the pattern

Our next summer reading recommendation is from Creative and Professional Writing lecturer Russell Schechter.

 Grey skies laden with menace. Chill winds gouging your skin like fairies with flick knives. Barbecue-blackened sausages which are somehow still trichinosis-pink at their core.

Ah, summer in England!

And time to read for fun. Oh, frabjous season!!

Here’s my suggested summer book guide: read what you want. Read what you really enjoy. And then read something completely different. If you never pick up non-fiction, read a biography. If you hate crime novels, read a murder mystery. Break your reading pattern and expand your horizons – for at least one book.

(What a mealy-mouthed recommendation. Criminy, just what you’d expect a miserable Creative Writing tutor to say.)

So here’s something more particular. Read a John Wyndham novel. It’s not exactly contemporary (he peaked in the 1950s), but good-golly-Miss-Molly was a he smart, economical and entertaining writer. Day of the Triffids. The Chrysalids. The Midwich Cuckoos. Pick one – you can’t go wrong. (NB Day of the Triffids is in the library!)

And remember to bring me back some rock from your holiday.

Summer reading: Angels and clowns

Our next summer reading recommendation is from first-year Creative and Professional Writing student Abi Silverthorne.

Image result for my name is minaMy summer recommendation would be My Name is Mina. It’s not necessarily a new release, but deserves a read by anyone who might have missed it till now. Fans of David Almond’s original work Skellig would be hard-pushed not to enjoy this prequel. It’s a fun and emotional step back into the fantastical world Almond built, only now through the surreal and slightly scatter-shot (but always funny) eyes of Mina. The book is never one thing, moving fluidly from fable to script to prose to poem to empty, interactive pages – it’s a pretty sensory experience to sit out in the garden with it and just go along.

Image result for stephen king it bookThis summer I’ll be bizarrely taking Stephen King’s It on holiday with me, because nothing says fun in the sun like a horror epic about the malevolent amalgamation of fear itself that terrorises children over decades.

Summer reading: From glum to glam – Richard Yates, Beatles and glam rock

Today it’s St Mary’s senior lecturer Richard Mills who offers up his summer reading recommendations and intentions.

The Easter Parade by Richard Yates should be read this, and every, summer. It starts with the genius first line  “Neither of the Grimes sisters would have a happy life” , and after this despairing start, Yates continues to pile the misery on. This novel is guaranteed to ruin any beach holiday –  I love it!


Image result for beatleboneImage result for i read the news today oh boy bookKevin Barry’s novel Beatlebone is about John Lennon fleeing his fame (and his demons) in the west of Ireland. Beatlebone is a must for all Beatles fans, as is Paul Howard’s award-winning biography of Tara Browne, I Read the News Today Oh Boy: Tara Browne, The Short and Gilded Life of the Man Who Inspired The Beatles’ Greatest Song (reading the title will take you most of the summer). Howard’s book is an Irish Great Gatsby; that is, a cautionary tale about success and excess,  but unlike Jay Gatsby, Tara Browne’s story – which inspired Lennon to write A Day in the Life is all true!


Image result for shock and awe reynoldsImage result for New Selected Poems ted hughesI’ll be reading Simon Reynolds’ Show and Awe: Glam Rock and its Legacy. It’s a big summer read, coming in at 687 pages! And a recommendation for my second-year poetry class: I’ll be dipping into Ted Hughes: New Selected Poems 1957-1994. This is a must for all you mad, bad, dangerous po-heads… sorry, poets.

Summer reading recommendations 2017

If it’s good enough for the newspapers – who give over most of their books coverage over the summer months to literary and celebrity back-patting and one-up-personship – then it’s good enough for us. We’re going to use this blog to give our summer reading recommendations. What we’ve read and recommend, and what we’ll be reading this summer on the terrace of our Tuscan villa/down the local lido/sitting in our kitchen staring at the rain (delete as applicable). There’ll be entries from students to follow, but here to start is Creative and Professional Writing Programme Director Jonathan Gibbs.

Image result for the luminaries catton

Any first year students who enjoyed Eleanor Catton’s The Rehearsal this year, and have lots of time on their hands over the summer, might want to try her second novel, The Luminaries. Coming in at over 800 pages, The Luminaries is a densely-potted, intricately-structured novel set in the lawless gold fields of C19th New Zealand. It’s a masterpiece of historical ventriloquism, with prospectors, whores, bankers and ghosts, but you really need a good sun lounger to let yourself get lost in its pages. This isn’t a book to try to read on your commute.

 

 

 

 

Image result for home marilynne robinsonThis summer I’ll be returning to Marilynne Robinson’s Home, the companion-piece to her quite wonderful Gilead, which I read on holiday a couple of years ago. It’s a quiet, beautifully-written telling of the story of the prodigal son, set in the plains of Iowa, but I need some peace and quiet to let it work its magic. This isn’t one to read on your commute either.

 

The short and the sweet: prize-winning and shortlisted stories to read online

April is a busy month for UK short story competitions, with the biggest and richest, and one of the newest and hippest both announcing their winners – and the good news is that all of the shortlisted entries are available to read online, making these a great resource for readers and writers. What is the current short story scene looking like? And what kinds of stories are winning prizes?

Firstly, the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award was won by Bret Anthony Johnston for his story ‘Half of What Atlee Rouse Knows About Horses’. This short story competition is very much an establishment gig – it is only open to writers who have been published in the UK (not self-published), and in fact Johnston is Director of Creative Writing at Harvard University. You don’t get much more established than that! Previous winners include Yiyun Li, Junot Diaz and Kevin Barry (who we’ve studied on the St Mary’s CPW course – his winning story, ‘Beer Trip to Llandudno’ can be read here.

Here’s the opening paragraph of Johnston’s story. It’s a tiny masterclass in grabbing the reader’s attention: the reins being held out of the car window, the name Buttons, Buttons never once turning left. And in the use of language: simple when it needs to be, but with vivid notes of colour, interest and intrigue: swaybacked, carnie, cowgirls.

His daughter’s first horse came from a travelling carnival where children rode him in miserable clockwise circles. He was swaybacked with a patchy coat and split hooves, but Tammy fell for him on the spot and Atlee made a cash deal with the carnie. A lifetime ago, just outside Robstown, Texas. Atlee managed the stables west of town; Laurel, his wife, taught lessons there. He hadn’t brought the trailer – buying a pony hadn’t been on his plate that day – so he drove home slowly, holding the reins through the window, the horse trotting beside the truck. Tammy sat on his back singing made up songs about cowgirls. She named him Buttons. No telling how long he’d been ridden in circles at the carnival. For the rest of his life, Buttons never once turned left.

You can read the rest of Johnston’s story and the rest of the shortlist can be read online here. Will you go for Celeste Ng’s intense first person story ‘Every Little Thing’? Or the experimental, Borgesian games of Richard Lambert’s ‘The Hazel Twig and the Olive Tree’?

Lambert’s story would have suited The White Review Short Story Prize, except that, in contrast to the Sunday Times gig, this is only open to writers who haven’t had a full book (novel or collection of stories published) – ie open to emerging writers. (I, me, Jonathan Gibbs, was shortlisted for the first iteration of the prize, in 2013: it was won that year by Claire-Louise Bennett, whose Pond we have also studied at St Mary’s.)

The White Review is a journal very much at the avant garde end of the literary scene, and so they are looking for writing that “explores and expands the possibilities of the form”. The say the prize was founded “to reward ambitious, imaginative and innovative approaches to creative writing”.

The winner this year is Nicole Flattery, for ‘Track’, a suitably edgy and nervy look at love and celebrity in contemporary New York. Here’s the opening paragraph:

My boyfriend, the comedian, took pleasure in telling me about rejection – how it came about, how to cope with dignity, how it had dangerous, possibly cancerous, elements. He said if I pinched just above my waistband, where the unfamiliar portions of fat resided, that’s what rejection felt like. He claimed the link between cancer and repeated failure was irrefutable. He had a lot of new, unusual ideas. ‘Feel that,’ he said, grasping at my hips and thighs, ‘that’s the texture of rejection right there.’

You can read ‘Track’ and all the other shortlisted stories here and even go back and read the stories from the four previous years.

What do you think? Are these inspirational? What can you learn from them? Could you do better?

Through the Looking Glass

Intrigued, I looked over. A pitiful feeling overwhelmed me as I looked into the eyes of a broken soul. You couldn’t see me even though you looked my way. I stared at you closely, as if I was right in front of you. You sat there, in the middle of the room on your chair, with just a desk in front of you. You looked around, eyes wandering over every visual detail as if you were a painter, taking in your surroundings before you picked up your brush.

I stood still, just staring at you through the mirror.

Unexpectedly, you got up from your seat and walked around, even though you didn’t have anywhere to go. Nor was there much space to move. As you moved around, you traced your hands against the edge of the table and made invisible footprints across the cold, grey floor.

You walked over and there you was standing in front of the mirror. My body stiffened, my chest tightened and my heart skipped a few beats. You looked at me, straight into my eyes – except you couldn’t see me.

You looked up, your eyes were soft and blue. As if you spoke to me, I could feel all your pain, your sorrow, your joy, your loneliness and your fire. I touched the mirror that separated us, pressing my fingertips against it. The coldness evaporated, filling each line of my personal ID; my finger print; all four of my fingers and my thumb.

As if you could see right through, or you could sense someone or something behind what wasn’t visible to your human eye, your hand stretched out, rubbing against the glass, creating a trail of smudged strokes. Until you got to me, until maybe you felt the heat. Your hand pressed against the glass, opposite mine. We stood there in a trance; time felt like it had stopped just for that moment.

Then you moved back, leaving my hand exposed and alone. You sat back down on the chair in the middle of the room, with only a table in front of you. I stood there, watching you from behind the mirror, until they came in. They placed you in hand cuffs and took you away.

Leaving me with only your evaporating finger painting on the mirrored canvas.

A flash fiction by 3rd Year Creative Writing student Sharmarni Danials.